Diploma of Classical Languages
Subjects


Each unit of study is worth 6 credit points (cps). Students must complete 8 units of study (a total of 48 cps) in order to complete the course.

Students must enrol in both Latin and Classical Greek units of study in their first year and thus complete 24 cps. This will give students the opportunity to appreciate the relation between the two languages, the differences and similarities characterising their underlying cultures, and the way they influenced their respective development. Students may decide to defer the study of one of the two languages, if the workload should prove to be onerous.

In the third semester students will specialise in one of the two languages and will therefore enrol in only one unit of study of the selected language per semester in the four final semesters.

LATIN

LAN101 - Classical Latin (Introductory)

Lan101 is designed for beginners and those who have not completed HSC Latin. The course requires no previous knowledge of a foreign language and/ or of English Grammar. The grammatical concepts and categories of the Latin language encountered during the course are explained and related to those of the English language so that students can develop a clear frame of reference. The course introduces the student to Latin phonetics, morphology, composition and vocabulary through the translation from and into Latin of simple, often made- up, sentences and the reading and translation of abridged or adapted passages from Latin literature in order to meet the linguistic experience and competence of students. The course is preceded by an introduction to the linguistic evolution of Latin from its origins in the Proto-Indo-European ancestral language until the development of a Latin Literary Tradition in the III century B.C.

LAN102 - Classical Latin II (Introductory)

Lan102 builds on the basic knowledge acquired in Lan101 and furthers and completes the student’s understanding of Latin morphology. The grammatical knowledge of the language is reinforced through the translation from and into Latin of sentences and passages either made up or adapted from classical texts. Students are encouraged to continue developing their knowledge of and familiarity with the Latin lexicon and basic phraseology.  Pronunciation and reading skills are strengthened and further developed through the reading of passages in prose from classical authors, such as Cicero, Cornelius Nepos, Eutropius and Livy, adapted or abridged in order to meet the level of linguistic experience and competence of students.

LAN203 - Classical Latin III (Intermediate Level)

Lan203 introduces students to the study of Latin syntax: the syntax of cases and the syntax of the verb. The understanding of Latin syntax is reinforced through the translation of sentences and passages from and into Latin adapted from the texts of classical authors (loci antiqui) in order to meet the linguistic experience and competence of students. During the course students are encouraged to compose passages in Latin modelled on those of the authors examined before progressing to the reading, grammatical analysis and translation of passages drawn directly from Latin literature (loci immutati). Authors examined during the semester are: Phaedrus, Cicero, Livy & Cornelius Nepos. Since ancient classical cultures greatly valued the art of memory, students will be introduced to the art of memory and rhetoric and encouraged to memorise poetry and passages of prose.

LAN204 - Classical Latin IV (Intermediate Level)

Lan204 builds on the knowledge of Latin syntax acquired in Lan203 and completes its study by introducing the student to the syntax of the period (i.e. coordination, consecutio temporum, clauses). The course focuses on the reading, grammatical analysis and translation of passages drawn directly from Latin literature (loci immutati). In order to reinforce the knowledge of Latin syntax and to begin introducing them to the pragmatics of the language, students engage in the composition of passages modelled on the authors examined. The course also introduces students to the study of Latin prosody and metric reading. Authors examined during the semester besides Cicero, are Pliny, Ovid and Virgil. Since ancient classical cultures greatly valued the art of memory, students will be invited to memorise poetry and passages of prose.

LAN301 - Language & Culture in Republican Rome (Advanced Level)

The subject focuses on the study of the Latin language within the context of the literary tradition of Ancient Rome. It aims at examining the development of the Latin language from the early documents or literary evidence (i.e. inscriptions) of Latin writing in the III century B.C. to its final standardisation in the works of Cicero and Varro (I B.C.). Students will engage in the reading and translation of texts of Latin authors such as Cato, Plautus, Terence, Ennius, Sallust, Catullus, Caesar, Livy, Lucretius, Cicero and Varro. During the course students are introduced to the problems connected with the transmission of the text and with the linguistic phenomenon of ‘text variety’, namely the relation of the language and its social environments, and its variations in response to changes in context and use (i.e. literary genre). Students also continue the study of Latin prosody and in the metric reading of Latin poetry initiated in Lan204.

LAN302 - Pagans & Christians from Augustus to Augustine (Advanced Level)

The unit continues to explore the evolution of the Latin language and the Roman literary tradition initiated in the previous unit through the reading and translation of texts written between the I and IV centuries. It examines the gradual transformation of semantics and syntax of the classical literary language prompted by the new spiritual, intellectual and cultural atmosphere characterising the first century of the Common Era. Students explore how, as Rome gradually lost its cultural centrality and the political control over its empire, the standard grammatical rules regulating the functioning of the language become more relaxed and flexible in order to express new ideas and concepts reading and translation skills are honed by regular exercises,  the translation of unseen passages, and Latin composition. The unit involves the close reading and analysis of classic works of Latin prose and poetry with particular attention to style and literary and narrative technique and performance.

GREEK

GRE101 - Classical Greek I (Introductory)

This subject is designed for beginners and those who have not completed HSC Ancient Greek. The course requires no previous knowledge of a foreign language and/or of English Grammar. The grammatical concepts and categories of the Classical Greek language, encountered during the course, are explained and related to those of the English language so that students can develop a clear frame of reference. The course introduces the student to Classical Greek phonetics,  morphology, composition  and  vocabulary  through the  translation from and into Greek of simple, often made-up, sentences, and the reading and translation of abridged passages adapted from Greek literature in order to meet the linguistic experience and competence of students. The course is preceded by an introduction regarding the linguistic evolution of Greek from early documentary evidence in the Mycenaean tablets until the development of the Ancient Greek Literary Tradition with the writing of the Homeric poems in the VIII century B.C.

GRE102 - Classical Greek II (Introductory)

GRE102 builds on the basic knowledge acquired in GRE101. It advances and completes the understanding of Greek morphology and introduces fundamental notions of Greek syntax. The grammatical knowledge of the language is reinforced through the translation of sentences and passages from and into Greek, while reading skills are further developed through the reading of excerpts of adapted prose and verse texts of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Xenophon & Plutarch.

GRE201 - Classical Greek III (Intermediate)

GRE201 introduces students to the study of Greek syntax through the study of the texts of classical authors. It is an intermediate course and presupposes a sound knowledge of classical Greek morphology. Through the examination of excerpts from the works of classical authors the student gradually develops an understanding of the semantics and pragmatics of classical Greek and an appreciation of the strong connection between syntax and semantics (i.e. structure and meaning). Students are also introduced to the study of Greek prosody and to the metric reading of Greek poetry.

During the course, students engage in the reading and translation of (often adapted) excerpts from the works of Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and Demosthenes.

GRE202 - Classical Greek IV (Intermediate)

The unit is based on the close reading, examination and translation of extended excerpts from selected classical texts of Greek prose and/or poetry. Students examine the problems involved in the phenomenon of the ‘translation’ of texts from one cultural-linguistic context to another, and are introduced to the phenomenon of ‘text variety’, namely the relation of the language to its social environments, and its variations in response to changes in context and use. During the course students are also introduced to the ‘history of reception’ which is intimately connected with the problem of translation, interpretation and philological examination of tests.

GRE301 - The Main Themes in Greek Literature (Advanced)

GRE302 - The Genres of Greek Literature (Advanced)