Latin

LAN101 - Classical Latin (Introductory)

Lan101 is designed for beginners and those who have not completed HSC Latin. The course requires no previous knowledge of a foreign language and/ or of English Grammar. The grammatical concepts and categories of the Latin language encountered during the course are explained and related to those of the English language so that students can develop a clear frame of reference. The course introduces the student to Latin phonetics, morphology, composition and vocabulary through the translation from and into Latin of simple, often made- up, sentences and the reading and translation of abridged or adapted passages from Latin literature in order to meet the linguistic experience and competence of students. The course is preceded by an introduction to the linguistic evolution of Latin from its origins in the Proto-Indo-European ancestral language until the development of a Latin Literary Tradition in the III century B.C.

LAN102 - Classical Latin II (Introductory)

Lan102 builds on the basic knowledge acquired in Lan101 and furthers and completes the student’s understanding of Latin morphology. The grammatical knowledge of the language is reinforced through the translation from and into Latin of sentences and passages either made up or adapted from classical texts. Students are encouraged to continue developing their knowledge of and familiarity with the Latin lexicon and basic phraseology.  Pronunciation and reading skills are strengthened and further developed through the reading of passages in prose from classical authors, such as Cicero, Cornelius Nepos, Eutropius and Livy, adapted or abridged in order to meet the level of linguistic experience and competence of students.

LAN104 - Ecclesiastical & Liturgical Latin

Ecclesiastical Latin is the Latin of the Catholic Church and therefore covers a wide range of uses: it is the Latin of Jerome’s Vulgate, of canon law, of the liturgy, of scholastic philosophers, of Church hymns and of papal bulls and Encyclicals. The course introduces students to the morphology and syntax of ecclesiastical Latin and its pronunciation through the translation from Latin and the reading of ecclesiastical and liturgical texts.  Students will be instructed to learn the quantities of vowels in order to appreciate the quantitative prosody of the Church hymns and understand the system behind accent-marks in extant Latin Missals and breviaries. Although desirable, no knowledge of Classical or Medieval Latin is required.

LAN203 - Classical Latin III (Intermediate Level)

Lan203 introduces students to the study of Latin syntax: the syntax of cases and the syntax of the verb. The understanding of Latin syntax is reinforced through the translation of sentences and passages from and into Latin adapted from the texts of classical authors (loci antiqui) in order to meet the linguistic experience and competence of students. During the course students are encouraged to compose passages in Latin modelled on those of the authors examined before progressing to the reading, grammatical analysis and translation of passages drawn directly from Latin literature (loci immutati). Authors examined during the semester are: Phaedrus, Cicero, Livy & Cornelius Nepos. Since ancient classical cultures greatly valued the art of memory, students will be introduced to the art of memory and rhetoric and encouraged to memorise poetry and passages of prose.

LAN204 - Classical Latin IV (Intermediate Level)

Lan204 builds on the knowledge of Latin syntax acquired in Lan203 and completes its study by introducing the student to the syntax of the period (i.e. coordination, consecutio temporum, clauses). The course focuses on the reading, grammatical analysis and translation of passages drawn directly from Latin literature (loci immutati). In order to reinforce the knowledge of Latin syntax and to begin introducing them to the pragmatics of the language, students engage in the composition of passages modelled on the authors examined. The course also introduces students to the study of Latin prosody and metric reading. Authors examined during the semester besides Cicero, are Pliny, Ovid and Virgil. Since ancient classical cultures greatly valued the art of memory, students will be invited to memorise poetry and passages of prose.

LAN205 - The Eternal City from Paganism to Christianity

The unit focuses on the study of the city of Rome as a space of social activity and cultural exchange in the first four centuries of the Christian Era. The unit traces the evolution in the function and meaning of the Urbs (city) and the contested relation between space, power and politics through the examination of key public spaces and monuments, and the analysis of relevant literary texts in Latin from the Age of Augustus to the Late Empire in order to identify the complex repertoire of often conflicting narratives meandering across time, and which contributed to shape the built environment.

The subject is based on field learning as it includes excursions to relevant sites of historical significance and is delivered in intensive mode over a three week period in Rome.

LAN301 - Language & Culture in Republican Rome (Advanced Level)

The subject focuses on the study of the Latin language within the context of the literary tradition of Ancient Rome. It aims at examining the development of the Latin language from the early documents or literary evidence (i.e. inscriptions) of Latin writing in the III century B.C. to its final standardisation in the works of Cicero and Varro (I B.C.). Students will engage in the reading and translation of texts of Latin authors such as Cato, Plautus, Terence, Ennius, Sallust, Catullus, Caesar, Livy, Lucretius, Cicero and Varro. During the course students are introduced to the problems connected with the transmission of the text and with the linguistic phenomenon of ‘text variety’, namely the relation of the language and its social environments, and its variations in response to changes in context and use (i.e. literary genre). Students also continue the study of Latin prosody and in the metric reading of Latin poetry initiated in Lan204.

LAN302 - Pagans & Christians from Augustus to Augustine (Advanced Level)

The unit continues to explore the evolution of the Latin language and the Roman literary tradition initiated in the previous unit through the reading and translation of texts written between the I and IV centuries. It examines the gradual transformation of semantics and syntax of the classical literary language prompted by the new spiritual, intellectual and cultural atmosphere characterising the first century of the Common Era. Students explore how, as Rome gradually lost its cultural centrality and the political control over its empire, the standard grammatical rules regulating the functioning of the language become more relaxed and flexible in order to express new ideas and concepts reading and translation skills are honed by regular exercises,  the translation of unseen passages, and Latin composition. The unit involves the close reading and analysis of classic works of Latin prose and poetry with particular attention to style and literary and narrative technique and performance.

LAN303 - Medieval Latin

Medieval Latin is a historically and culturally contextualised introduction to the Latin of the Middle Ages. It is the language of the Liberal Arts par excellence. The course is designed for students, who have completed the learning of Classical Latin morphology and syntax. Medieval Latin is not a homogeneous language and regional variations in grammar and orthography are evident. Consequently it has no standard grammar in the traditional sense. It is the Latin learnt from grammars compiled in Late Antiquity with variations in orthography, occasional errors in morphology and syntax, brought about by external phenomena such as the emergence of a vernacular literary tradition and the changed intellectual environment which marked the end of Classical Antiquity. The course is based on the principle of discitur ambulando and focuses mainly on the reading, translation and contextualisation of medieval texts. The texts selected for the course cover various areas of use such as medieval history, philosophy, theology and literature.